philosophy

The Pinnacle of Settlement

Author: Revels

The funny thing about our generation is that apparently there have been a lot of firsts. Breaking stereotypes has become the stereotype – and if you’re not breaking one, you’re supporting someone doing it. Different perceptions have offered varying opinions on whatever happens, but it does not change the fact that we have decided to take matters into our own hands, to disrupt tradition and say no without worrying about the world abandoning us because there’s always someone out there in favour of the drift.

 

Our traditions developed somewhere along the long way that humans have come – we hunted, moved a lot, didn’t have proper language until slowly we realised proper ways to settle, communicate and gather food. We created proper housing, transportation, farmed and processed more food, institutionalised education systems, political systems and so much more until we had achieved a system of living we were satisfied with.

Our people first settled as tribes, then as joint families, then as separate families and eventually people started living on their own. We might just have reached the pinnacle of settlement – did anyone ever think someone would be able to live in a place of their own without fear of security or starvation? People always settled in groups because there was strength in numbers – and as we breathe in an era where anyone can live by themselves, we see a new concept – people not wanting to live in one place at all.

To experience more cultures, to see other areas of the world, a group of people have now decided to never stay in one place, to move from one city to the other, from one country to the next, using their skills to earn whatever amount of money they require to keep going. A rather ironic change, just as we have what we had aimed for, some folks prefer the nomadic way of life. Settling is perhaps not in everyone’s nature, and in a world where nomadic tribes were slowly decreasing, we might see a new kind of nomad. A nomad who has decided to leave the ways he or she is accustomed to and to find fulfilment through a ritual of the past. Are humans really never satisfied with what they have? Or has the age old tradition come knocking again?

 

The group of people devoted to traveling in such a way might be small, but our generation has been the first to have a majority who prefers traveling to settling down and building a house and a family.Could our roots be coming back to take us around and help us realize how being successful does not lie in financial security but rather in learning to connect with the world and embrace the wonders it comes with?

Could this be the next thing our generation takes hold off? Could this end racial and nationalistic differences? Could this wipe away general ignorance and end more stereotypes?

Only the future knows.

Revels is a Pakistani student, blogger and contributing writer at The Conversation Room 

You can visit her excellent blog here:

https://identity17.wordpress.com/

 

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2 comments on “The Pinnacle of Settlement

  1. it’s a nice idea that nomadism would do away with cultural intolerance but as Hemingway had it, travel rarely broadens the mind, merely the arse. Let’s hope he’s wrong…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Is this nomadism tolerable as long as they can keep in constant contact with their “peeps” through their smart phones, Instagram, Pinterest, etc. And how much of this nomadism stems from losing the economic base for people to stay settled? And then again, is this nomadism just today’s version of the intrepid explorer of yesteryear?

    Liked by 1 person

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