Frankie Boyle on Grenfell Tower, Being Offensive & The “Outrage” Media

 

 

In this riveting exchange Guardian journalist Owen Jones interviews Scottish genius and highly offensive comedian Frankie Boyle. 

Boyle who has a huge social media following is back on the BBC after it was rumoured he was permanently banned for “offensive” material on the queen and autism. Yet he recently returned with a new hit satire show “New World Order” on BBC 2.

He is a well known social commentator with an acute and always fascinating take on the public sentiment. In this interview he discusses the media, morality and political correctness:

“People can see a link between Theresa May’s desire to scrap the Human Rights Act and the inhumane disgraceful treatment of the Grenfell Tower victims; even if they don’t have a media which is willing to convey that”

He further spoke of faux public morality and how “as we live in a country which profits from selling arms to viscous regimes and launders money for financial institutions” we have to create a fake morality based on taste.

“Oh that joke was too much” or “that play should be banned” to create the illusion that we are morally pure.

Whatever you make of Boyle he offers some exciting ideas on morality, political correctness and the media here.

 

Frankie has been a long term proponent of having more female comedians on the public airwaves and his show features two of the best in Britain right now, Katherine Ryan & Sarah Pascoe – you can watch the latest episode here:

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Why I’d Vote For Corbyn

Professor Noam Chomsky speaks to BBC Newsnight to discuss the anger which has raged across the Middle and Working Classes of Western democracies since the economic collapse in 2008.

Discussing the roots of the anger, the rise of far right nationalism as well as the optimistic signs of youth galvanisation around progressive policies on climate change and income inequality – Chomsky discusses why he would vote for Jeremy Corbyn in the UK general election in the context of Brexit.

This is a riveting interview from one of the words best known progressive public intellectuals and gives some interesting insights into the global order and future of western democracy.

Why Science is Bigger Than Politics

Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses the ignominious dismissal of science in the political arena. Arguing that if those in power think that science is just an opinion and begin to implement policy and legislation in that vein, then that is beginning of the unravelling of an informed democracy.

If the scientific method is reduced to something that people think is an opinion and is thought to be a partisan issue. Tyson argues this is a fundamental misconception of what science is and why it works. And how this mistrust shows the poor standards of the american education system. There is legitimate scepticism on scientific claims due its funding and the vested interests in the carrying out of the research and then there is flagrant denial of scientific consensus based on nothing but feeling.

This is an engaging and lively monologue which touches on the american political climate and the mistrust in science without evidence to refute scientific claims.

 

What Would Elon Musk Be Working On If He Was 22?

Inventor, Entrepreneur and Englineer discusses what he views as the most important work to be doing if he was a young person in 2017.

Musk has been at the centre of the conversation around artificial intelligence and sustainable energy consumption over the past 15 years. He is ranked the 21st most influential people in the world and his current company SpaceX are working on a project to eventually allow humans to colonise Mars.

What Do Humans Really Want?

Are humans just naturally lazy, comfort and pleasure seeking beings? Or do we really want dignity and fulfilment?

in this riveting excerpt professor Noam Chomsky discusses how the billions upon billions of dollars spent on advertising has been used to psychologically manipulate are ideas of what we want.

Tracing trends from the industrial revolution of the 1800’s to the educated poor in the 1930’s, Chomsky argues that what we really want is a sense of belonging and dignity in our work, not evermore accumulation and consumption of products.

What are your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

Wikipedia Proves Fake News Hysteria is Bullsh*t

Katherine Maher, executive director at the Wikimedia Foundation discusses how Wikipedia went from a site loaded with errors and false information to the world’s trusted open encyclopedia.

Through the process of constant self improvement and a dedication to ensuring accurate information, Wikipedia shows that sorting fact from fiction is a much easier job than has been made out from public figures such as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Maher suggsts that the way news is consumed and how information is spread is more the problem than fake news itself.  It is the profiteering, commercial model of clickbait and stretching of truth as companies and individuals fight for our screen time that must be seen as the focal point of fake news.

She states the product design is flawed and the major providers need to take a stand on the way information is presented to the consumer and allowing quick resolution to removing what is fake, just as Wikipedia has done:

“When I’m looking at a Facebook feed I don’t know why information is being presented to me. Is it because it’s timely? Is it because it’s relevant? Is it because it’s trending, popular, important?
All of that is stripped out of context so it’s hard for me to assess: is it good information that I should make decisions on? Is it bad information that I should ignore? And then you think about the fact that all of the other sort of heuristics that people use to interpret information, where does it come from? Who wrote it? When was it published? All of that is obscured in the product design as well.”

So does Fake News really have the problem or is this an obfuscation of what is really causing the spread of misinformation?

How to Stop Wasting Your Days on Facebook

It’s an addiction. A stimulation we crave. Yet it can really inhibit the quality of our lives and ability to focus on hard tasks. Most of us would admit we spend way too much time aimlessly drifting through newsfeeds but how do we beat it?

Author Charles Duhigg believes we must treat it like any other ingrained habit. Accept that we have a dependency and slowly try and wean ourselves off.

This can be done by scheduling timeslots in the day when we will use social media and removing automatic notification alerts that we don’t need and slowly start creating a new habit of focus.